Month: August 2018

New Journal in Digital History

Current Research in Digital History is just out from the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and Media, with its first volume comprising 17 articles and a CFP for the 2019 conference.

“Current Research in Digital History is an annual open-access, peer-reviewed publication of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. Its primary aim is to encourage and publish scholarship in digital history that offers discipline-specific arguments and interpretations. By featuring short essays, it also seeks to provide an opportunity to make arguments on the basis of ongoing research in larger projects.

Essays published in CRDH are first presented at an annual one-day conference at George Mason University in Arlington, Virginia. Authors submit their essays in the fall, and then the conference is held in the spring. Each essay goes through two rounds of peer review, first by the conference program committee, and then by the conference commentator. CRDH is published at the end of August, less than a year after essays are submitted.

The platform for Current Research in Digital History offers the following features in order to effectively publish a range of scholarship:

  • publication of visualizations, graphics, and narratives
  • publication of associated data or code in a research compendium
  • external hosting of content if necessary, provided that authors agree to maintain the content
  • DOIs and other metadata for all articles
  • indexing in Google Scholar and other academic databases”

Doing Digital Scholarship

Interested in getting into DH? New on SSRC: Doing Digital Scholarship resource page, with How-To guidelines, training sessions and much more, including search function for tutorials, info on digital publishing, and resources on building your online presence.

Doing Digital Scholarship offers a self-guided introduction to digital scholarship, designed for digital novices. It allows you to dip a toe into a very large field of practice. It starts with the basics, such as securing web server space, preserving data, and improving your search techniques. It then moves forward to explore different methods used for analyzing data, designing digitally inflected teaching assignments, and creating the building blocks required for publishing digital work.”