Author: Anke Finger

How Digital Media feed (into) your Publishing Cycle

Christine Tulley, professor of English and rhetoric, emphasizes the shift from linear publishing models to more circular, cross-referential publishing cycles that include promotion of one’s own research in combination with a media profile:

Trends in both scholarly publishing as well as libraries’ role in the research and publication processes confirm this shift from a linear process to a circular one. Research from both early career researchers across disciplines (CIBER 2016; Wells and Soderlund 2018) and experienced academics (Tulley 2018), in addition to a large scale study of academic publishing habits across the academic lifecycle conducted by Bec Evans and Chris Smith of Prolifiko, indicate the publishing process is no longer a linear process and the roles of libraries, publishers, and researchers have all developed in response to issues such as open access, REF guidelines in the UK and tenure and promotion processes in the US, and emerging support roles for academic libraries. As a researcher and faculty developer who specializes in moving authors from idea to publication, four significant shifts across disciplines have emerged in how ideas move from researchers to published research and back again to researchers as readers.

Her guest post for The Scholarly Kitchen ends with the following recommendations:

As a researcher who writes for publication, but also someone who supports academics who write, I’d like to see publishers recognize the fluid publication lifecycle at the point of submission. Submission spaces have, more or less, retained the traditional model of inviting an author to submit a manuscript, and waiting for a review to return. Few guidelines exist for published authors promoting research prior to publication beyond rules about previous publication. I’d also like to see academic libraries thinking about offering collections in terms beyond published scholarship including data sets, author commentary on projects, and public peer review of work in progress.

Explore Space with Immersive Data Sculpture

OUCHHH, an independent new media studio, has created a digital media installation, datagate, with which to explore outer space interactively. Here is their summary of the project:

The installation consists of 3 parts; Form, Light and Space. Light is world’s first artwork based upon the idea of utilization of Machine Learning in the context of space discovery and astronomical research through NASA’s Kepler Data Sets.

By using the Kepler data from NASA, the public will be able to observe the exoplanets [planets that orbit around other stars] which human life can exist in. By taking this concept one step further, Ouchhh aims for this artwork to be considered as a gate between our planet and other habitable planets around the universe.

Ouchhh visualized and stylized the findings of these Neural Networks for identifying exoplanets using the dimming of the flux. The resulting work will invite visitors to plunge into the fascinating world of space discovery through immersive data sculpture. The installation will offer a poetic sensory experience and is meant to become a monument of mankind’s contemplative curiosity and profound need for exploration.

 

The March – Digital Exhibition focusing on Blue’s 1964 documentary

A new digital exhibition presents different aspects of the 1963 documentary by James Blue, including a restored version of the film.

The digital exhibition The March is the result of a collaborative project led by David A. Frank (Professor of Rhetoric and Mellon Faculty Fellow), the University of Oregon Libraries, and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, with individual contributions by members of both institutions (see below). This exhibition received inspiration and support from The James Blue Project, a research interest group at the University of Oregon devoted to creating a “living archive” from materials relating to the James Blue papers in UO Libraries’ Special Collections and University Archives.

Women also Know

The Scholarly Kitchen, a website, blog and podcast about scholarly publishing, just published an impressive list of resources listing women experts. Why?

“There are, alas, still too many examples of journalism, panels, conferences, and book lists with what my dad called “pale male syndrome.” A pale male engineer himself, he long ago made the sensible observation that diversity creates more stable and sustainable systems — as well as being equitable and just. Last year Scholarly Kitchen Chefs and guests posted regularly about these issues, including Jasmine Wallace on the necessity of breaking out of comfort zones to tackle diversity and inclusion and Alison Muddit on Breaking the Silence on #MeToo in scholarly publishing. A powerful post “On Being Excluded: Testimonies of People of Color in Scholarly Publishing,” and a follow-up second part, was anonymous at the request of the participants – an indicator of how difficult and sensitive the situation can be. These were among the most read posts of 2018, another measure of the importance of inclusion and diversity. One pattern in the posts is the relationship between talking about the problem, and taking action. As Jasmine noted, “Far too often… we do way too much talking about diversity and inclusion, and don’t take enough action to make diversity or inclusion happen.” A concern with identifying positive action was the prompt for other posts, and several Chefs, including Jasmine, cited the formation of the Coalition for Diversity and Inclusion in Scholarly Communications.” Read more here!

Ranke.2 Digital Source Criticism

Ranke.2 presents a new resource for historians and other humanists to discuss and teach the hermeneutics of source evaluation:

Objectives of Ranke.2

  1. How digitisation and the web have changed the nature of historical research.
  2. How digital objects are created (retro-digitised, born-digital, converted documents).
  3. What changes when an analogue source is turned into a digital representation.
  4. How to question the concept of the “original”.
  5. How information is added to a digital object (metadata).
  6. How data is published online and made searchable.
  7. What the impact of search engines is on finding and selecting sources.
  8. How to apply a number of digital tools to data.
  9. The difference between conducting research in an archive and online.
  10. The properties of different types of data (text, images, objects, audio-visual).

 

Intro to GIS and mapping with Scholars’ Lab

University of Virginia’s Scholars’ Lab is making intro classes to mapping available on their site:

The Scholars’ Lab GIS workshop sessions are designed to be accessible without prior knowledge or experience with GIS software and to give attendees hands-on experience with step-by-step instructions. Workshop topics are based on the how-to questions Kelly and Chris answer daily in their interactions with faculty and students in the Scholars’ Lab, in addition to emerging themes in geospatial scholarship.

“Feminist Modernist Studies” Special Issue on Digital Humanities

The 3rd issue of the new Feminist Modernist Studies journal focuses on the issue of feminist scholarship with and within DH practices:

In our CFP we asked, what might feminism offer DH? Across this cluster, essays agreed that feminist DH is not just “about women,” but entails a collaborative feminist practice of breaking down boundaries, enabling new syntheses based on situated knowledges, shifting subject positions and interpretations. Until recently, DH has been prominently associated with scientific neutrality, “big data,” quantification and the ensuing practices of distant reading or macroanalysis. However, as feminist theorists (and many modernist writers) have long observed, purportedly “objective” knowledge systems can and do inscribe exclusionary, hierarchical assumptions.

Question that Algorithm

The Data&Society Research Institute just published its primer on “Algorithmic Accountability,” originally presented to the Congressional Progressive Caucus on April 18, 2018 as “Tech Algorithm Briefing: How Algorithms Perpetuate Racial Bias and Inequality.” Here’s a synopsis of its contents:

Algorithmic Accountability: A Primer explores issues of algorithmic accountability, or the process of assigning responsibility for harm when algorithmic decision-making results in discriminatory and inequitable outcomes.

Currently, there are few consumer or civil rights protections that limit the types of data used to build data profiles or that require the auditing of algorithmic decision-making, even though algorithmic systems can make decisions on the basis of protected attributes like race, income,or gender–even when those attributes are not referenced explicitly–because there are many effective proxies for the same information.

This brief explores the trade-offs between and debates about algorithms and accountability across several key ethical dimensions, including:

  • Fairness and bias;
  • Opacity and transparency;
  • The repurposing of data and algorithms;
  • Lack of standards for auditing;
  • Power and control; and
  • Trust and expertise.

 

New Journal in Digital History

Current Research in Digital History is just out from the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and Media, with its first volume comprising 17 articles and a CFP for the 2019 conference.

“Current Research in Digital History is an annual open-access, peer-reviewed publication of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. Its primary aim is to encourage and publish scholarship in digital history that offers discipline-specific arguments and interpretations. By featuring short essays, it also seeks to provide an opportunity to make arguments on the basis of ongoing research in larger projects.

Essays published in CRDH are first presented at an annual one-day conference at George Mason University in Arlington, Virginia. Authors submit their essays in the fall, and then the conference is held in the spring. Each essay goes through two rounds of peer review, first by the conference program committee, and then by the conference commentator. CRDH is published at the end of August, less than a year after essays are submitted.

The platform for Current Research in Digital History offers the following features in order to effectively publish a range of scholarship:

  • publication of visualizations, graphics, and narratives
  • publication of associated data or code in a research compendium
  • external hosting of content if necessary, provided that authors agree to maintain the content
  • DOIs and other metadata for all articles
  • indexing in Google Scholar and other academic databases”